Library: Tendinitis

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Groin Strain

Tendon attaches muscle to bone and is the focus for the “pull” of the muscle. What happens in Groin Strain is that the muscle pulls part of the tendon away from the bone or away from the belly of the muscle and the attachment point (or focus) becomes frayed and sore. There is extra pressure on these point when you over-stretch your leg outwards, or it can be pressured by kicking a ball and those repeated jarring effects can cause damage. While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment is usually weaker and first to give.

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Tags: Groin, Legs, Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles, Groin Strain, Sports Injuries, Sprain, Tendinitis

Rupture of the Tendon

Tendon attaches muscle to bone and is the focus for the “pull” of the muscle. When you damage it (see Tendinitis) the muscle pulls part of the tendon away from the bone and the attachment point (or focus) becomes frayed and sore. In the case of a rupture the tendon becomes completely detached from the bone and you can no longer move the joint. While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment to the bone is usually weaker and first to give. Tendinitis is most common at the sites of the strongest muscles (quads, arm muscles, calves).

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Tags: Arms and Legs, Tendons, rupture -, Muscles, Joint strains, Muscle sprain or strain, Rupture of Tendons, Tendinitis

Rupture of the Biceps Tendon

In a rupture, the tendon gets completely detached from the bone or the belly of the muscle and you can no longer move the joint. The biceps is different because it has two tendons instead of one, and usually only one tears. This means that it is less sore than normal and that you can still bend your elbow upwards without too much pain but the muscle bulges upwards into a ball.

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Tags: Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, rupture -, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Biceps Tendinitis

While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment to the bone is usually weaker and first to give. The shoulder is a very common place for tendinitis. It is worst when you combine arm and shoulder movements as you do in playing a forehand shot in tennis.

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Tags: Neck & Shoulder, Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Rupture of the Supraspinatus Tendon

While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment to the bone is usually weaker and first to give. Tendinitis is very common at the shoulder. This tendon is involved in all shoulder movements. It prevents downward drag on the arm as in carrying.

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Tags: Neck & Shoulder, Shoulder, Tendons, rupture -, Dislocation, Neck / Shoulder problems, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Supraspinatus Tendinitis

Tendinitis is very common at the shoulder. This tendon is involved in all shoulder movements. It prevents downward drag on the arm as in carrying. The most painful movement involves moving the straight arm out to the side and up over the head. The middle part of this movement causes pain; from 45 to 160 degrees and lowering the arm from this position is also extremely painful.

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Tags: Upper Body, Neck & Shoulder, Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, Muscles, Dislocation, Muscle sprain or strain, Neck / Shoulder problems, Sports Injuries, Sprain, Tendinitis

Infraspinatus Tendinitis

Tendon attaches muscle to bone and is the focus for the “pull” of the muscle. When you damage it the muscle pulls part of the tendon away from the bone and the attachment point (or focus) becomes frayed and sore. While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment to the bone is usually weaker and first to give. Tendinitis is very common at the shoulder.

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Tags: Upper Body, Shoulder, Arms and Legs, Tendons, Muscle sprain or strain, Neck / Shoulder problems, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Achilles Tendinitis

Tendons are bands of tough tissue that join muscle to bone. The Achilles is the tendon that joins the calf muscle to the heel. When the calf muscle contracts it pulls on the Achilles tendon and this points the toes down. A rupture happens when too much pull is put on the tendon by the calf muscles. Tendinitis happens when only some of the strands or fibres of the tendon snap or break, or where they become frayed or inflamed.

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Tags: Legs, Ankle, Tendons, Muscles, Achilles Tendinitis, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Sprained Ankle

Your ankle joint is made up of three bones held together by two main ligaments, one on either side. Since the inside (near the other ankle) ligament is the strongest, most strains are caused when the ankle joint bends outward. In bending, the ligaments on the outside are over-stretched and as it is made up of taut bands, some (or all) of these may tear, depending on the severity of the twist. In doing this, you may also break the bone in you leg. It is always wise to have an x-ray after a severe sprain.

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Tags: Ankle, Tendons, Muscles, Sports Injuries, Sprained Ankle, Tendinitis

Rupture of the Achilles Tendon

The Achilles is the tendon that joins the calf muscles to the heel. When the calf muscle contracts it pulls on the Achilles tendon and this points the toes down. A rupture happens when too much pull is put on the tendon by the calf muscle. This happens because the calf muscle is a strong muscle and the foot when it “pushes off” exerts a lot of pressure.

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Tags: rupture, Arms and Legs, Lower Body, Feet, Tendons, Ankle Sprain or Strain, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

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