Library: Sports Injuries

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Torn Ligaments

The 3 bones of the knee are held together by 4 main ligaments, 2 at the front, deep in the knee, which run from top to bottom, diagonally and cross each other. Since they cross, they are referred to as cruciate ligaments. The other 2 ligaments are located, one at either side. The knee is normally a very strong and stable joint, because of the strength of these ligaments. Tearing or severing any one of these ligaments, aside from being extremely painful, is very damaging to the stability of the joint and consequently a career threatening injury. Torn ligaments will not heal themselves, they need to be surgically repaired. Usually ligaments torn in the centre will be sewn together, and ligaments torn from the bone will be stapled back on to it.

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Tags: Lower Body, Knees, Shin, Ligaments, torn, Tendons, Ligament Tear, Sports Injuries

Ligament Sprain

Ligament connects bone to bone and keeps a joint steady. The 3 bones of the knee are held together by 4 main ligaments, 2 of which run inside, from top to bottom diagonally and cross each other. Since they cross, they are referred to as cruciate (or crossing) ligaments. The other 2 ligaments are located, one at either side of the joint. A healthy knee is an extremely strong and stable joint, due almost entirely to the holding power of these 4 ligaments. They have half the holding power of steel and are tremendously flexible.

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Tags: Knees, Ligaments, Ligament Sprain, Sports Injuries

Swollen Knee - Osgood Schlatter Disease

The muscles of the thigh are the strongest in your body. They are attached to your leg by a tendon just below the kneecap. When you are sitting and want to straighten your leg their strength is focused on a small area just under the kneecap on the “bump” of the knee. In younger people, particularly boys aged 12 who are active in sport, this part of the knee is not yet fully developed and damages easily due to the stronger than normal pull of over developed muscles. Osgood Schlatter Disease is the name given to an overuse injury where the knee gets sore and swollen at this point.

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Tags: Knees, Tendons, Muscles, Sports Injuries, Swollen Knee - Osgood Schlatter Disease

Referred Pain

Referred pain is pain that is felt at a distance from its source. Referred pain in the knee may be coming from your back or your hip. If, for example, you have a prolapsed disc which is pressing on the sciatic nerve the pain can be transmitted along the nerve and be felt anywhere along its path. The further the point of pain from the source the greater the level of damage to the nerve. Back pain that makes your foot sore is usually more serious than if the all the discomfort was in the back. The pain may also be referred to your knee from “trigger points” in your muscles.

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Tags: Whole Body, Arms and Legs, Lower Body, Ligaments, Spine, Tendons, Muscles, Back pain, Joint strains, Muscle Tears, Muscle sprain or strain, Referred Pain, Sports Injuries

Loose Bodies in the Knee - Osteochondritis Dissecans

Sometimes small amounts of bone or cartilage come loose in the knee and float around the joint. There are a number of reasons why this can happen. You may have damaged a blood vessel through injury, and part of the bone and joint has come away. You may have Osteoarthritis where particles of the bone have come loose. You may have chipped part(s) of a bone, again from an old injury. Or parts of the lining of the joint crumble and become hardened.

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Tags: Joints, Knees, Loose Bodies in the Knee - Osteochondritis Dissecans, Osteoarthritis, Sports Injuries

Torn Muscle - Muscle Tears

Your muscles are made of fibres resembling threads wound into rope. Each layer is covered by “cling film”. A muscle tear happens when these “threads” are stretched too much and break. As they break, the severed ends spring back and curl up. This space is then filled with blood which causes the discoloration that appears as bruising after a day or so. Muscles can tear for many reasons, lack of proper warm-up, over stressing, weakness from a previous injury or poor repair, over tired, tense or cold muscles damage more easily.

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Tags: Muscles, torn, Muscle Tears, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries

Coccydynia

Your coccyx, also known as the “tail bone” is made up of the lowest 5 bones in the spine. Usually some of the 5 are joined together so that you may have only three or so segments. Your coccyx is as individual as you are, they come in all shapes and sizes! These segments, like all bones are held together by ligaments. Coccydynia is the term for any pain coming from the coccyx area. Pain can start from a blow (kick in the butt), a fall on your bottom, childbirth, or by a small bony growth that inflames a bursa.

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Tags: Back - Lower, Lower Body, Ligaments, Spine, Tendons, Muscles, Back pain, Coccydynia, Sports Injuries

Back Strain

Your back is made up of a series of 33 bones (or vertebrae) stacked like poker chips, one on top of the other to form the spine. The spine sits on the sacrum, which in turn is attached to your pelvic bone. All of these are held together by a by a complex series of ligaments and muscles. The ligaments allow slight movement to occur at the joints, and when you over-stretch these ligaments and the joints become locked, it is called Back Strain.

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Tags: Back - Upper, Back - Lower, Ligaments, Spine, Tendons, Muscles, Back pain, Neck / Shoulder problems, Sports Injuries

Rupture of the Biceps Tendon

In a rupture, the tendon gets completely detached from the bone or the belly of the muscle and you can no longer move the joint. The biceps is different because it has two tendons instead of one, and usually only one tears. This means that it is less sore than normal and that you can still bend your elbow upwards without too much pain but the muscle bulges upwards into a ball.

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Tags: Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, rupture -, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Biceps Tendinitis

While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment to the bone is usually weaker and first to give. The shoulder is a very common place for tendinitis. It is worst when you combine arm and shoulder movements as you do in playing a forehand shot in tennis.

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Tags: Neck & Shoulder, Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

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