Library: Shoulder

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Tenosynovitis

Tendons attach muscle to bone and are the focus for the “pull” of the muscle. They are encased in sheaths that are naturally lubricated so that they slide easily when you use your muscles. In Tenosynovitis there is a malfunction of the lubricating system between the tendons and their sheath in the affected joints, causing them to “grate” and they then become irritated and inflamed. The sheath then becomes thickened and the tendons can no longer glide smoothly. This will sometimes cause the finger to click as you bend or straighten it. This is an over-use injury caused by repetitively using the fingers when they are under too much stress. It may also be caused by infection. It is a common condition among typists.

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Tags: Shoulder, Hands, Legs, Feet, Ligaments, Tendons, Sports Injuries, Tenosynovitis

Spasmodic Torticollis

Spasmodic Torticollis (ST) is a condition thought to be caused by a neurological disorder. It is not unlike having a permanent “cramp” in your neck muscles. Usually, because you are unable to move the neck you will hold it at an awkward angle causing one shoulder to be held higher than the other. It is not clear exactly what causes the condition so it is difficult to treat.

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Tags: Upper Body, Head, Neck, Neck & Shoulder, Shoulder, Muscles, Head - problems turning the head, Muscle sprain or strain, Neck / Shoulder problems

Osteoporosis - Brittle Bone Disease

Osteoporosis is another name for brittle bone disease. For you bones to stay healthy they need among other things a plentiful supply of calcium and exercise. The calcium supply to the bones may be affected by a number of factors including a gene that is unable to efficiently process calcium, a biochemical change in your blood, a lack of exercise or taking certain medications. If the body is short of calcium it takes whatever it needs from the bones and leaves them short. As a result bones stop growing and they become brittle.

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Tags: Whole Body, Shoulder, Back - Upper, Back - Lower, Back pain, Fracture, Osteoporosis

Osteoarthritis of the Acromioclavicular Joint - Shoulder

While Osteoarthritis is a condition most people are likely to suffer from if they live long enough, it is rare in the shoulder joint. As a “wear and tear” type illness it tends to affect weight bearing joints, (hips, spine and knees). But you may get it in the shoulder if you damaged it when you were younger. What happens is that the lining of your joints, once hard and shiny and an excellent gliding surface, begins to wear, crack and erode until the lining is gone and bone rubs directly off bone.

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Tags: Shoulder, Arthritis, Neck / Shoulder problems, Osteoarthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis is a condition that causes the body to attack itself. The lining of the joints are the first to be affected becoming hot and swollen, with the protective coverings of the joints and ligaments being worn down. Usually, a number of joints are involved at the same time; most likely to suffer are the hands, wrists, feet, knees and elbows. It can also affect other parts of the body, including the heart. Nobody is sure what causes the disease, but it often comes in phases that can ease up after a few months or years.

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Tags: Whole Body, Shoulder, Arms, Hands, Wrists, Legs, Arthritis, Neck / Shoulder problems, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rupture of the Biceps Tendon

In a rupture, the tendon gets completely detached from the bone or the belly of the muscle and you can no longer move the joint. The biceps is different because it has two tendons instead of one, and usually only one tears. This means that it is less sore than normal and that you can still bend your elbow upwards without too much pain but the muscle bulges upwards into a ball.

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Tags: Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, rupture -, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Biceps Tendinitis

While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment to the bone is usually weaker and first to give. The shoulder is a very common place for tendinitis. It is worst when you combine arm and shoulder movements as you do in playing a forehand shot in tennis.

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Tags: Neck & Shoulder, Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Rupture of the Supraspinatus Tendon

While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment to the bone is usually weaker and first to give. Tendinitis is very common at the shoulder. This tendon is involved in all shoulder movements. It prevents downward drag on the arm as in carrying.

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Tags: Neck & Shoulder, Shoulder, Tendons, rupture -, Dislocation, Neck / Shoulder problems, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Supraspinatus Tendinitis

Tendinitis is very common at the shoulder. This tendon is involved in all shoulder movements. It prevents downward drag on the arm as in carrying. The most painful movement involves moving the straight arm out to the side and up over the head. The middle part of this movement causes pain; from 45 to 160 degrees and lowering the arm from this position is also extremely painful.

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Tags: Upper Body, Neck & Shoulder, Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, Muscles, Dislocation, Muscle sprain or strain, Neck / Shoulder problems, Sports Injuries, Sprain, Tendinitis

Infraspinatus Tendinitis

Tendon attaches muscle to bone and is the focus for the “pull” of the muscle. When you damage it the muscle pulls part of the tendon away from the bone and the attachment point (or focus) becomes frayed and sore. While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment to the bone is usually weaker and first to give. Tendinitis is very common at the shoulder.

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Tags: Upper Body, Shoulder, Arms and Legs, Tendons, Muscle sprain or strain, Neck / Shoulder problems, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

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