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Tenosynovitis

Tendons attach muscle to bone and are the focus for the “pull” of the muscle. They are encased in sheaths that are naturally lubricated so that they slide easily when you use your muscles. In Tenosynovitis there is a malfunction of the lubricating system between the tendons and their sheath in the affected joints, causing them to “grate” and they then become irritated and inflamed. The sheath then becomes thickened and the tendons can no longer glide smoothly. This will sometimes cause the finger to click as you bend or straighten it. This is an over-use injury caused by repetitively using the fingers when they are under too much stress. It may also be caused by infection. It is a common condition among typists.

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Tags: Shoulder, Hands, Legs, Feet, Ligaments, Tendons, Sports Injuries, Tenosynovitis

Cramp in Muscles - Hamstring Muscle Cramp

Cramp is your muscles way of telling you to ease up. Either you are using them for longer than they are used to or you are using them harder than they are used to. During cramp your muscles contract involuntarily for a sustained period of time. There are many factors that can make cramp happen so it is difficult to say exactly what causes it. Suddenly undertaking exercise for much longer than you are used to can cause it as can exercising at a higher level.

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Tags: Lower Body, Legs, Feet, Tendons, Muscles, Muscle Cramps

Hamstring Muscle - Torn Calf Muscle

Your muscles are made of fibres resembling threads. A muscle tear happens when these “threads” are stretched too much and break. As they break, the severed ends spring back and curl up. This space is then filled with blood which causes the discoloration that appears as bruising after a day or so. Muscles can tear for many reasons, lack of proper warm-up, over stressing, weakness from a previous injury or poor repair, over tired, tense or cold muscles damage more easily. The amount and severity of the tear depends on the severity of the stretch or the blow you received.

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Tags: Lower Body, Legs, Muscles, torn, Hamstring muscle tear, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries

Hamstring Muscle Strain

Your muscles are made of fibres resembling threads and wrapped in “cling film”. A muscle tear happens when some of these fibres are stretched too much and break. As they break, the severed ends spring back and curl up. This space is then filled with blood which causes the discoloration that appears as bruising after a day or so. Muscles can tear for many reasons, lack of proper warm-up, over stressing, weakness from a previous injury or poor repair. Over-tired, tense or cold muscles damage more easily. The amount and severity of the tear depends on the severity of the stretch or the blow you received.

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Tags: Lower Body, Legs, Muscles, strain, Hamstring muscle tear, Sports Injuries, Sprain

Groin Strain

Tendon attaches muscle to bone and is the focus for the “pull” of the muscle. What happens in Groin Strain is that the muscle pulls part of the tendon away from the bone or away from the belly of the muscle and the attachment point (or focus) becomes frayed and sore. There is extra pressure on these point when you over-stretch your leg outwards, or it can be pressured by kicking a ball and those repeated jarring effects can cause damage. While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment is usually weaker and first to give.

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Tags: Groin, Legs, Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles, Groin Strain, Sports Injuries, Sprain, Tendinitis

Sciatica

The sciatic nerve is the longest in your body, coming from the spinal cord in the small of your back, dividing in two and running through both buttocks, legs, and calves and finishing in the feet. When this nerve is pinched and becomes sore it is called Sciatica. This may happen for a number of reasons. The cushions between the bones in your spine (vertebrae) can bulge outwards and press on it (see Prolapsed Disc).

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Tags: Back - Lower, Lower Body, Hips, Legs, Feet, Muscles, Back pain, Sciatica

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis is a condition that causes the body to attack itself. The lining of the joints are the first to be affected becoming hot and swollen, with the protective coverings of the joints and ligaments being worn down. Usually, a number of joints are involved at the same time; most likely to suffer are the hands, wrists, feet, knees and elbows. It can also affect other parts of the body, including the heart. Nobody is sure what causes the disease, but it often comes in phases that can ease up after a few months or years.

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Tags: Whole Body, Shoulder, Arms, Hands, Wrists, Legs, Arthritis, Neck / Shoulder problems, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Achilles Tendinitis

Tendons are bands of tough tissue that join muscle to bone. The Achilles is the tendon that joins the calf muscle to the heel. When the calf muscle contracts it pulls on the Achilles tendon and this points the toes down. A rupture happens when too much pull is put on the tendon by the calf muscles. Tendinitis happens when only some of the strands or fibres of the tendon snap or break, or where they become frayed or inflamed.

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Tags: Legs, Ankle, Tendons, Muscles, Achilles Tendinitis, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Morton’s Metatarsalgia

Pain in the ball of your foot is called Metatarsalgia. Where this type of pain is confined to the 3rd and 4th toes it is called Morton’s Metatarsalgia. The piercing pain is caused by a pinching of the nerve that serves the toes. It is a pain that is often associated with Flat Foot or Fallen Arches.

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Tags: Legs, Knees, Ankle, Feet, Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles, Fallen Arches, Flat Feet, Pain in ball of foot - Morton's Metatarsalgia

Fallen Arch - Flat Feet

The foot is an amazingly complex unit of 26 bones tied together with ligaments, muscles, fascia and tendons. Some of this fascia joins the front of the foot to the heel, working like a bowstring to create an arch. When you stand, the inside of the foot usually has a space between it and the floor. This is called your arch. If you have flat feet this arch is absent.

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Tags: Lower Body, Legs, Knees, Feet, Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles, Ankle Sprain or Strain, Fallen Arches, Flat Feet, Muscle sprain or strain

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