Library: Knees

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Fracture - Knee

A fracture is another name for a break in the bone. There are 3 bones in the knee and these are held together by ligaments. The knee joint is designed in such a way as to allow great flexibility and strength. The leg bones themselves are capable of withstanding compression of a ton or more and the ligaments have half the tensile strength of steel. This strength and flexibility must be severely limited in order for your fracture to heal after a break, and often a plaster cast is required running from the thigh to the instep. As with most broken bones, once held immobile in a rigid plaster, the bone is capable of healing itself.

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Tags: Knees, Fracture, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries

Torn Ligaments

The 3 bones of the knee are held together by 4 main ligaments, 2 at the front, deep in the knee, which run from top to bottom, diagonally and cross each other. Since they cross, they are referred to as cruciate ligaments. The other 2 ligaments are located, one at either side. The knee is normally a very strong and stable joint, because of the strength of these ligaments. Tearing or severing any one of these ligaments, aside from being extremely painful, is very damaging to the stability of the joint and consequently a career threatening injury. Torn ligaments will not heal themselves, they need to be surgically repaired. Usually ligaments torn in the centre will be sewn together, and ligaments torn from the bone will be stapled back on to it.

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Tags: Lower Body, Knees, Shin, Ligaments, torn, Tendons, Ligament Tear, Sports Injuries

Ligament Sprain

Ligament connects bone to bone and keeps a joint steady. The 3 bones of the knee are held together by 4 main ligaments, 2 of which run inside, from top to bottom diagonally and cross each other. Since they cross, they are referred to as cruciate (or crossing) ligaments. The other 2 ligaments are located, one at either side of the joint. A healthy knee is an extremely strong and stable joint, due almost entirely to the holding power of these 4 ligaments. They have half the holding power of steel and are tremendously flexible.

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Tags: Knees, Ligaments, Ligament Sprain, Sports Injuries

Swollen Knee - Osgood Schlatter Disease

The muscles of the thigh are the strongest in your body. They are attached to your leg by a tendon just below the kneecap. When you are sitting and want to straighten your leg their strength is focused on a small area just under the kneecap on the “bump” of the knee. In younger people, particularly boys aged 12 who are active in sport, this part of the knee is not yet fully developed and damages easily due to the stronger than normal pull of over developed muscles. Osgood Schlatter Disease is the name given to an overuse injury where the knee gets sore and swollen at this point.

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Tags: Knees, Tendons, Muscles, Sports Injuries, Swollen Knee - Osgood Schlatter Disease

Loose Bodies in the Knee - Osteochondritis Dissecans

Sometimes small amounts of bone or cartilage come loose in the knee and float around the joint. There are a number of reasons why this can happen. You may have damaged a blood vessel through injury, and part of the bone and joint has come away. You may have Osteoarthritis where particles of the bone have come loose. You may have chipped part(s) of a bone, again from an old injury. Or parts of the lining of the joint crumble and become hardened.

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Tags: Joints, Knees, Loose Bodies in the Knee - Osteochondritis Dissecans, Osteoarthritis, Sports Injuries

Dislocated Kneecap - Patella

The patella is anatomical name for the kneecap. It is embedded in the tendon at the end of the thigh muscles and slides in a groove as the thigh muscle shortens and lengthens. It acts as part of a pulley, sliding over the end of the thigh bone, transferring the pull of the quadriceps muscle when you straighten your knee. In fact, it is involved in every action of the knee joint and every time you move your knee the kneecap glides along its track.

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Tags: Back - Lower, Arms and Legs, Lower Body, Knees, Shin, Ankle, Ligaments, Dislocated Kneecap - Patella, Joint strains

Morton’s Metatarsalgia

Pain in the ball of your foot is called Metatarsalgia. Where this type of pain is confined to the 3rd and 4th toes it is called Morton’s Metatarsalgia. The piercing pain is caused by a pinching of the nerve that serves the toes. It is a pain that is often associated with Flat Foot or Fallen Arches.

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Tags: Legs, Knees, Ankle, Feet, Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles, Fallen Arches, Flat Feet, Pain in ball of foot - Morton's Metatarsalgia

Fallen Arch - Flat Feet

The foot is an amazingly complex unit of 26 bones tied together with ligaments, muscles, fascia and tendons. Some of this fascia joins the front of the foot to the heel, working like a bowstring to create an arch. When you stand, the inside of the foot usually has a space between it and the floor. This is called your arch. If you have flat feet this arch is absent.

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Tags: Lower Body, Legs, Knees, Feet, Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles, Ankle Sprain or Strain, Fallen Arches, Flat Feet, Muscle sprain or strain

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