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Ulnar Neuritis

Your nerves bring the information from your brain to your muscles that tells them when you want them to move. This information is brought to the outside of the hand (little finger side) via the ulnar nerve. It travels under your elbow to the ring and little finger and is sometimes called the “funny bone”. Too much pressure on this nerve over a time can damage it causing numbness, a burning feeling and a tingling sensation in the hand and fingers.

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Tags: Arms, Elbow, Hands, Neuritis, Sports Injuries

Mallet Finger

This injury happens when a hard blow to your finger tears the tendon away from the bone. Sometimes a small fragment of the bone will break off too. This means that you will not be able to straighten the finger joint nearest your nail without using your other hand. The joint will straighten if you use your other hand but not on its own. Unless the injury is treated properly, it will remain permanently bent and could be prone to arthritis in later life.

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Tags: Arms, Hands, Fingers, Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles, Mallet finger

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Your nerves bring the information from your brain to your muscles that tells them when you want them to move. This information is brought to the hand via nerves like the median nerve. As the nerve leaves the wrist, it enters the hand through a tunnel (The Carpal Tunnel) where it is tightly protected. Too much pressure on this nerve over a time can damage it causing numbness and a feeling of pins and needles in the thumb and forefinger.

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Tags: Arms, Hands, Wrists, Muscles, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Prolapsed Disk - Spine

Your spine is made up of 33 bones, each about one inch high, stacked like poker chips one on top of the other. Each of these bones has a hollow and when they are stacked the hollows combine to form a canal running from your neck to the bottom of the back. Inside this tunnel the spinal cord (your nerve centre) runs. The bones in the back can move slightly, they give the curve to your spine and move when you straighten and bend. They can also rotate slightly.

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Tags: Back - Upper, Back - Lower, Arms, Hands, Spine, Back pain

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis is a condition that causes the body to attack itself. The lining of the joints are the first to be affected becoming hot and swollen, with the protective coverings of the joints and ligaments being worn down. Usually, a number of joints are involved at the same time; most likely to suffer are the hands, wrists, feet, knees and elbows. It can also affect other parts of the body, including the heart. Nobody is sure what causes the disease, but it often comes in phases that can ease up after a few months or years.

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Tags: Whole Body, Shoulder, Arms, Hands, Wrists, Legs, Arthritis, Neck / Shoulder problems, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rupture of the Biceps Tendon

In a rupture, the tendon gets completely detached from the bone or the belly of the muscle and you can no longer move the joint. The biceps is different because it has two tendons instead of one, and usually only one tears. This means that it is less sore than normal and that you can still bend your elbow upwards without too much pain but the muscle bulges upwards into a ball.

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Tags: Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, rupture -, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Biceps Tendinitis

While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment to the bone is usually weaker and first to give. The shoulder is a very common place for tendinitis. It is worst when you combine arm and shoulder movements as you do in playing a forehand shot in tennis.

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Tags: Neck & Shoulder, Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, Sports Injuries, Tendinitis

Supraspinatus Tendinitis

Tendinitis is very common at the shoulder. This tendon is involved in all shoulder movements. It prevents downward drag on the arm as in carrying. The most painful movement involves moving the straight arm out to the side and up over the head. The middle part of this movement causes pain; from 45 to 160 degrees and lowering the arm from this position is also extremely painful.

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Tags: Upper Body, Neck & Shoulder, Shoulder, Arms, Tendons, Muscles, Dislocation, Muscle sprain or strain, Neck / Shoulder problems, Sports Injuries, Sprain, Tendinitis

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