Mallet Finger

This injury happens when a hard blow to your finger tears the tendon away from the bone. Sometimes a small fragment of the bone will break off too. This means that you will not be able to straighten the finger joint nearest your nail without using your other hand. The joint will straighten if you use your other hand but not on its own. Unless the injury is treated properly, it will remain permanently bent and could be prone to arthritis in later life.

Read the full article »

Tags: Arms, Hands, Fingers, Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles, Mallet finger

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Your nerves bring the information from your brain to your muscles that tells them when you want them to move. This information is brought to the hand via nerves like the median nerve. As the nerve leaves the wrist, it enters the hand through a tunnel (The Carpal Tunnel) where it is tightly protected. Too much pressure on this nerve over a time can damage it causing numbness and a feeling of pins and needles in the thumb and forefinger.

Read the full article »

Tags: Arms, Hands, Wrists, Muscles, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Hamstring Muscle - Torn Calf Muscle

Your muscles are made of fibres resembling threads. A muscle tear happens when these “threads” are stretched too much and break. As they break, the severed ends spring back and curl up. This space is then filled with blood which causes the discoloration that appears as bruising after a day or so. Muscles can tear for many reasons, lack of proper warm-up, over stressing, weakness from a previous injury or poor repair, over tired, tense or cold muscles damage more easily. The amount and severity of the tear depends on the severity of the stretch or the blow you received.

Read the full article »

Tags: Lower Body, Legs, Muscles, torn, Hamstring muscle tear, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries

Hamstring Muscle Strain

Your muscles are made of fibres resembling threads and wrapped in “cling film”. A muscle tear happens when some of these fibres are stretched too much and break. As they break, the severed ends spring back and curl up. This space is then filled with blood which causes the discoloration that appears as bruising after a day or so. Muscles can tear for many reasons, lack of proper warm-up, over stressing, weakness from a previous injury or poor repair. Over-tired, tense or cold muscles damage more easily. The amount and severity of the tear depends on the severity of the stretch or the blow you received.

Read the full article »

Tags: Lower Body, Legs, Muscles, strain, Hamstring muscle tear, Sports Injuries, Sprain

Groin Strain

Tendon attaches muscle to bone and is the focus for the “pull” of the muscle. What happens in Groin Strain is that the muscle pulls part of the tendon away from the bone or away from the belly of the muscle and the attachment point (or focus) becomes frayed and sore. There is extra pressure on these point when you over-stretch your leg outwards, or it can be pressured by kicking a ball and those repeated jarring effects can cause damage. While the tendons themselves are enormously strong (half the tensile strength of steel), the attachment is usually weaker and first to give.

Read the full article »

Tags: Groin, Legs, Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles, Groin Strain, Sports Injuries, Sprain, Tendinitis

Fracture - Knee

A fracture is another name for a break in the bone. There are 3 bones in the knee and these are held together by ligaments. The knee joint is designed in such a way as to allow great flexibility and strength. The leg bones themselves are capable of withstanding compression of a ton or more and the ligaments have half the tensile strength of steel. This strength and flexibility must be severely limited in order for your fracture to heal after a break, and often a plaster cast is required running from the thigh to the instep. As with most broken bones, once held immobile in a rigid plaster, the bone is capable of healing itself.

Read the full article »

Tags: Knees, Fracture, Muscle sprain or strain, Sports Injuries

Torn Ligaments

The 3 bones of the knee are held together by 4 main ligaments, 2 at the front, deep in the knee, which run from top to bottom, diagonally and cross each other. Since they cross, they are referred to as cruciate ligaments. The other 2 ligaments are located, one at either side. The knee is normally a very strong and stable joint, because of the strength of these ligaments. Tearing or severing any one of these ligaments, aside from being extremely painful, is very damaging to the stability of the joint and consequently a career threatening injury. Torn ligaments will not heal themselves, they need to be surgically repaired. Usually ligaments torn in the centre will be sewn together, and ligaments torn from the bone will be stapled back on to it.

Read the full article »

Tags: Lower Body, Knees, Shin, Ligaments, torn, Tendons, Ligament Tear, Sports Injuries

Ligament Sprain

Ligament connects bone to bone and keeps a joint steady. The 3 bones of the knee are held together by 4 main ligaments, 2 of which run inside, from top to bottom diagonally and cross each other. Since they cross, they are referred to as cruciate (or crossing) ligaments. The other 2 ligaments are located, one at either side of the joint. A healthy knee is an extremely strong and stable joint, due almost entirely to the holding power of these 4 ligaments. They have half the holding power of steel and are tremendously flexible.

Read the full article »

Tags: Knees, Ligaments, Ligament Sprain, Sports Injuries

Swollen Knee - Osgood Schlatter Disease

The muscles of the thigh are the strongest in your body. They are attached to your leg by a tendon just below the kneecap. When you are sitting and want to straighten your leg their strength is focused on a small area just under the kneecap on the “bump” of the knee. In younger people, particularly boys aged 12 who are active in sport, this part of the knee is not yet fully developed and damages easily due to the stronger than normal pull of over developed muscles. Osgood Schlatter Disease is the name given to an overuse injury where the knee gets sore and swollen at this point.

Read the full article »

Tags: Knees, Tendons, Muscles, Sports Injuries, Swollen Knee - Osgood Schlatter Disease

Referred Pain

Referred pain is pain that is felt at a distance from its source. Referred pain in the knee may be coming from your back or your hip. If, for example, you have a prolapsed disc which is pressing on the sciatic nerve the pain can be transmitted along the nerve and be felt anywhere along its path. The further the point of pain from the source the greater the level of damage to the nerve. Back pain that makes your foot sore is usually more serious than if the all the discomfort was in the back. The pain may also be referred to your knee from “trigger points” in your muscles.

Read the full article »

Tags: Whole Body, Arms and Legs, Lower Body, Ligaments, Spine, Tendons, Muscles, Back pain, Joint strains, Muscle Tears, Muscle sprain or strain, Referred Pain, Sports Injuries

brand + website by redmoonmedia