Library

Welcome to the Priory Clinic Library, where you will find information on conditions and therapies. The Priory Clinic works closely with the Institute of Physical Therapy and Applied Science (IPTAS), Ireland's leading college of physical therapy - which now offers a B. Sc in Applied Science - click here to visit IPTAS in a new window.

The Priory Clinic Library is where our therapists and staff can post notations and in-depth information about conditions and therapies. Our patients and the public are welcome to browse or search. Please note that articles in the Library are presented "as is" and The Priory Clinic makes no claim or warrants that information presented here is 100% accurate, nor should any therapeutic advice be taken or acted upon without first consulting one of our therapists. To talk with a therapist or make an appointment, please call The Priory Clinic on 1800 254 642.

Tension Headache

90% of all headaches are tension headaches. They are called “tension” because they come from tightness in the muscles of the body, particularly those of the neck and scalp. Usually the headache builds gradually during the day. You may notice it after hard work, anxiety or stress. Any activity that causes you to hold your head in a fixed position for a long time triggers it, like working with computers, typing, or sleeping awkwardly. Most people suffer from tension headaches from time to time and they can last from a few hours to years.

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Tenosynovitis

Tendons attach muscle to bone and are the focus for the “pull” of the muscle. They are encased in sheaths that are naturally lubricated so that they slide easily when you use your muscles. In Tenosynovitis there is a malfunction of the lubricating system between the tendons and their sheath in the affected joints, causing them to “grate” and they then become irritated and inflamed. The sheath then becomes thickened and the tendons can no longer glide smoothly. This will sometimes cause the finger to click as you bend or straighten it. This is an over-use injury caused by repetitively using the fingers when they are under too much stress. It may also be caused by infection. It is a common condition among typists.

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Tags: Shoulder, Hands, Legs, Feet, Ligaments, Tendons, Sports Injuries, Tenosynovitis

Fracture Wrist - Hand

A fracture is another name for a break in the bone. There are 8 bones in the wrist joining the bones of the hand and arm, and these are held together by ligaments. The wrist joint is designed in such a way as to allow great flexibility and strength. This flexibility must be severely limited in order for your fracture to heal after a break, and often a plaster cast is required running from the hand to the elbow. As with most broken bones, once held immobile in a rigid plaster, the bone is capable of healing itself.

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Tags: Hands, Wrists, Fracture, Sports Injuries

Skier’s Thumb

This painful condition is caused by over-stretching the thumb. As the thumb is forced backwards toward the wrist, the ligament over-stretches and causes pain. Ligament connects bone to bone and keeps joints stable. If it is over stretched the joint becomes loose. The repair to a damaged ligament is always slow because of poor blood supply to the area. Other tissue like scar tissue grows much more quickly and your body will use this to replace the damaged part of the ligament. Scar tissue is not nearly as efficient as the original ligament. Without effective therapy the thumb may never fully recover.

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Tags: Hands, Thumbs, Ligaments, sprained, Ligament Sprain, Skiers Thumb, Sports Injuries

Dislocated Finger

This a common minor injury, frequent in contact sports like football, rugby and basketball. If your hand is caught awkwardly in a tackle, or struck by a ball your finger may slip slightly out of alignment on contact. Usually this happens at the joint above the knuckle. It will be very sore and you will be unable to bend it properly. The amount of swelling will be small depending on how recently it has happened and in the early stages bruising will not be seen.

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Tags: Hands, Fingers, Dislocated Finger, Sports Injuries, Sprain

Wrist Sprain

Ligament connects bone to bone and keeps a joint steady. It is made from tough cord-like tissue, but has a weak blood supply and so finds it difficult to repair itself. They have half the holding power of steel and are tremendously flexible. The ligament is made up of fibres, like string twisted in to a rope. When you tear your ligament (see: Ligament Tear) you cut the rope. When you sprain it, you over-stretch or tear some of these strings or fibres.

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Tags: Hands, Wrists, Repetitive Stress Syndrome, Sports Injuries, Sprain, Wrist Sprain

Ulnar Neuritis

Your nerves bring the information from your brain to your muscles that tells them when you want them to move. This information is brought to the outside of the hand (little finger side) via the ulnar nerve. It travels under your elbow to the ring and little finger and is sometimes called the “funny bone”. Too much pressure on this nerve over a time can damage it causing numbness, a burning feeling and a tingling sensation in the hand and fingers.

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Tags: Arms, Elbow, Hands, Neuritis, Sports Injuries

Cramp in Muscles - Hamstring Muscle Cramp

Cramp is your muscles way of telling you to ease up. Either you are using them for longer than they are used to or you are using them harder than they are used to. During cramp your muscles contract involuntarily for a sustained period of time. There are many factors that can make cramp happen so it is difficult to say exactly what causes it. Suddenly undertaking exercise for much longer than you are used to can cause it as can exercising at a higher level.

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Tags: Lower Body, Legs, Feet, Tendons, Muscles, Muscle Cramps

Trigger Finger

Tendons attach muscle to bone and are the focus for the “pull” of the muscle. Some are encased in sheaths that are naturally lubricated so that they slide easily when you use your muscles. In Trigger finger there is a malfunction of the lubricating system between the tendons and their sheath in the affected finger or thumb, causing them to “grate” and they then become irritated and inflamed. The sheath then becomes thickened and the tendons can no longer glide smoothly. This will sometimes cause the finger to click as you bend or straighten it. This is an over-use injury caused by repetitively using the thumb when it is under too much stress.

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Tags: Hands, Fingers, Tendons, Muscles, Trigger Finger

Dupuytren’s Contracture

Connective Tissue is the name given to the substance that holds you together and gives your body its unique shape. It encloses your muscles, tendons, ligaments, bones and other organs. This fibrous tissue forms a web under your skin protecting and supporting your hand. In order for your hand to work at its best, all these structures need to be in perfect condition. In Dupuytren’s Contracture the fibrous tissue starts to thicken, and the skin and tendons begin to stick to each other so you can no longer open and close your fingers properly. Then it begins to contract, shortening the tendons and preventing your fingers from opening fully. Gradually you lose all movement in the fourth and fifth fingers and they become permanently closed. You will also notice a lump in your palm near the affected fingers that slowly develops into a cord-like band.

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Tags: Hands, Fingers, Wrists, Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles

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